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55 Golf Courses

There are 55 golf courses that are either in the Irish Riviera or within a reasonable journey. In time we'll add course reviews and other information. We have placed all of the nearest courses on a our active map of golf courses - see the link on the left of this page. 
(hint - When the active Map opens - click the green dot at the right hand side of the map)

Ballinamona Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (022) 29314

Ballinamona, Mourneabbey, Mallow

Bandon Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (023) 41111

Castle Bernard, Bandon

Berehaven Golf Club & Amenity ParkCounty CorkPhone (027) 70700
Castletownbere
Blarney Golf CourseCounty CorkPhone (021) 4382455
Stoneview, Blarney
Cobh Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4812399
Ballywilliam, Cobh
Coosheen Golf LinksCounty CorkPhone (028) 28182
Coosheen, Schull
Cork Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4353451
Little Island, Cork
Doneraile Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (022) 24137
Doneraile
Douglas Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4895297
Douglas
East Cork Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4631687
Gurtacrue, Midleton
Estate Garden's & Golf CourseCounty CorkPhone (023) 33249
Lisselan, Ballinascarthy, Clonakilty
Fermoy Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (025) 32694
Corrin,Fermoy 
Fernhill Carrigaline Golf & Health ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4372226
Fernhill, Carrigaline 
Fota Island Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4883700
Fota Island, Carrigtwohill
Frankfield Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4363124
Frankfield Grange, Douglas, Cork
Glengarriff Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (027) 63150
Glengarriff
Harbour Point Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4353094
Clash rd, Little Island Cork
Kanturk Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (029) 50534
Fairy Hill, Kanturk
Kinsale Golf ClubCounty CorkPhone (021) 4774722
Farrangalway, Kinsale
Dungarvan Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (058) 43310
Knocknagranagh, Dungarvan
Dunmore East Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 383151
Dunmore East
Faithlegg Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 382241
Faithlegg House, Waterford
Gold Coast Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (058) 44055
Clonea Strand, Dungarvan
Lismore Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (058) 54026
Lismore
Tramore Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 386170
Newtown Hill, Tramore
Waterford Castle Hotel & Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 871633
The Island Ballinakill
Waterford Golf ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 876748
Newrath, Waterford
West Waterford Golf & Country ClubCounty WaterfordPhone (058) 43216
Coolcormac, Dungarvan
Williamstown Golf CourseCounty WaterfordPhone (051) 853131
Williamstown, Waterford
Ballykisteen Golf & Country ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (062) 33333
Ballykisteen, Limerick Junction
Cahir Park Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (052) 41474
Kilcommon, Cahir
Carrick on Suir Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (051) 640047
Garravoone
Cashel Golf RangeCounty TipperaryPhone (062) 62111
Ballyknock, Cashel
Clonmel Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (052) 24050
Mountain rd, Clonmel
Nenagh Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (067) 31476
Beechwood Nenagh
Roscrea Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (0505) 21130
Derryvale, Roscrea
Slievenamon Golf GlubCounty TipperaryPhone (052) 32213
Clonacody, Lisronagh, Clonmel
Templemore Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (0504) 31400
Manna Sth Templemore
Thurles Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (0504) 21983
Turtulla, Thurles
Tipperary Golf ClubCounty TipperaryPhone (062) 51119
Rathanny, Tipperary
Ballybunion Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (068) 27146
Ballybunion
Ballyheigue Castle Golf CourseCounty KerryPhone (066) 7133555
Ballyheigue
Beaufort Golf CourseCounty KerryPhone (064) 44440
Churchtown, Beaufort, Killarney
Castlegregory Golf & Fishing ClubCounty KerryPhone (066) 7139444
Stradbally, Castlegregory
Dingle Golf Club (Ceann Sibéal)County KerryPhone (066) 9156255
Ballyferriter
Dooks Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (066) 9768205
Glenbeigh
Dunloe Golf CourseCounty KerryPhone (064) 44578
Dunloe, Killarney
Kenmare Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (064) 41291
Kenmare
The Kerries Golf CourseCounty KerryPhone (066) 7122112
The Kerries, Tralee
Killarney Golf & Fishing ClubCounty KerryPhone (064) 31034
Mahony's Point, Killarney
Killorglin Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (066) 9761979
Stealroe, Killorglin
Listowel Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (068) 21592
Feale View, Listowel
Ring of Kerry Golf & Country ClubCounty KerryPhone (064) 42000
Templenoe, Kenmare
Tralee Golf ClubCounty KerryPhone (066) 7136379
West Barrow, Ardfert
Waterville House & Golf LinksCounty KerryPhone (066) 9474102
Waterville

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  • Miles of beautiful beaches  ( 1 items )

    There are dozens of beaches in the Irish Riviera - and over time we'll write a review on many of them. At the centre of the Riviera is Youghal and it is blessed with not one, but two blue flag beaches, that offer miles and miles of seaside fun. Not only that, but there are literally dozens of other beaches within minutes of the town. If you want a secluded cove, a safe sandy beach, a hidden suntrap or a wide open strand - you don't have far to go.

    The Blue Flag award is an internationally recognised symbol of beach and water cleanliness, and has been presented to the two largest beaches - Youghal Strand and Clay Castle that are the most popular beaches in the area. These beaches employ fully qualified Lifeguards during the summer months.

    Youghal strand
    Youghal Strand empty in February
    Awarded a blue flag for cleanliness and water quality. Fine sand and sunbathing. Huge open strand, with plenty of space for all beach games. Good swimming and bodysurfing conditions prevail frequently. Generally safe bathing, with very gently sloping sands, smooth underfoot, and few currents. Lifeguards on duty during peak season. Ample car parking along the length of the beach . The beach is tidal, with few areas above the high water mark. At low tide the sea recedes 100 yards or more. Located 3/4 mile from the centre of Youghal town.

    Youghal Clay Castle strand
    Awarded a blue flag for cleanliness and water quality. Fine sand and sunbathing. Huge open strand, with plenty of space for all beach games. Good swimming and bodysurfing conditions prevail frequently. Generally safe bathing, with very gently sloping sands, some rocks underfoot. Ample car parking along the length of the beach . The beach is mostly tidal, but with a large area of soft sand, shells and pebbles above the high water mark. At low tide the sea recedes 100 yards or more.
    Located next to Youghal strand, 1.5 miles from the centre of Youghal town.

    Youghal Green Park beach
    Green Park Beach Youghal
    Green Hole beach, as it is often called, is just 400 yards from the centre of Youghal and right next to some the largest holiday accommodation. Fine sand and sunbathing. Can be more sheltered than the main beaches if the wind is from the East. At low tide its a huge open beach, with plenty of space for all beach games. Generally safe for paddling, with very gently sloping sands, smooth underfoot, but care should be taken when swimming because of the currents. Ample car parking along the road. The beach is tidal, with no areas above the high water mark. At low tide the sea recedes 80 yards or more. The side of the beach has many low level rock pools, with a profusion of wildlife including shrimps, fish and shellfish - they are a favourite haunt of children with their nets! At certain times of year, dependent upon the tides and recent weather, this beach can have a lot of seaweed upon it. If it has go elsewhere - no other beach in Youghal has this problem.
    Located 1/4 mile from the centre of Youghal town.

    Youghal Town or Mall beach
    This beach is just 50 yards from the centre of Youghal and between the town quay and the Mall House Arts Centre. A very fine sandy beach, its ideal for sunbathing and for small kids. It's much smaller than the other beaches, and has walls at either side - making it easy to keep an eye out on your toddlers, as they cannot wander too far. Its is usually more sheltered than the main beaches. This beach is not tidal, and is always perfect for sandcastles, or relaxing. Generally safe for paddling, with very gently sloping sands, some pebbles underfoot, but care should be taken when swimming because of the currents. Ample Car Parking in the main car park adjacent.
    Located right in the centre of Youghal town.

    The 49 Steps in Youghal
    Not really a beach, certainly not at high tide, but a favoured bathing and sunbathing spot none the less. Two steep sets of steps bring you down to an area of rocks and sandy coves right beside the Lighthouse. It catches the sun for most of day and is so sheltered it is always the hottest sunbathing spot. The rocks also have a diving board, that can be used at high tide only. This is great fun for young and old alike. Some of the more hardy locals swim here every day of the year. The rocks are not suitable for toddlers, but older children will have hours of fun playing among the plentiful rock pools - they are full of life. If you are into shellfish, you can pick your own mussels, cockles, winkles and whelks - they grow in profusion. Park carefully on the other side of the road from the Lighthouse.
    Located 1/2 mile from the centre of Youghal town.

  • Whale and Dolphin Watching  ( 1 items )

     Dolphins_WOT.jpgIf you are not lucky enough to be able to watch the Dolphins as they play near the promenade in Youghal, you can take a boat ride to get closer to Dolphins and you may see Whales too. Whale and dolphin watching trips operate from Youghal and Cork harbours. The same boats also operate trips from Kinsale. The duration of the dolphin and whale watching trips is about 3-4 hours.

    Find out more and see the video

  • Thrill seekers and active fun  ( 12 items )

    There is lots to do for all ages in the Irish Riviera. Here we have tried to give a balanced view of some of the more popular outdoor activities that are usually available throughout the year, activities that are centred on Youghal.

    Boating, Fishing, Diving, Dolphin watching
    Youghal's little town quays are busy throughout the year with the local fishermen plying their trade. In the summer the influx of pleasure crafts of all sort add to the colour and and activity. The town quays offer easy access for day boats and, and the are plenty of safe anchorage's for visiting yachts. In the spring and summer a variety of crafts are available for daily hire for pleasure and fishing.

    Canadian Canoes, Youghal, A great pleasure trip up the River Blackwater.Canadian canoes are for hire, allowing easy access for all to the harbour areas, the estuary and river basin.
    There will also be daily organised trips up the river in two massive 20 man canoes, the only ones in Ireland. Not to be missed.

    The fishing boat Liscannon is making day long fishing trips for 12 people, and promises a great full day trip. In the summer evenings the same boat is making short fishing trips, and when they are nearby, Dolphin watching trips around the bay. Of course these are wild animals and come and go as they please, but large pods of dolphins and porpoises live in the Youghal Bay area and love to swim with the passing boats. A certain times of year there are numbers of basking sharks and other shark varieties, and even migrating whales to be seen too. The same trip also passes by the Knockadoon head bird sanctuary and around Capel Island too.

    There are other fishing trips available from nearby Ardmore, which also hosts Ardmore Deep Sea Diving. The enclosed bay of Ardmore offers ideal conditions for sheltered inshore diving, and further out to sea there are numerous dive sites including several wrecks. Ardmore Diving offer standard PADI Open Water certification as well as general recreational and technical diving facilities. They have an offshore 105 and a dive rib and equipment for rental.

    Contact us to book a Blackwater canoe trip, day long fishing trip, diving or Dolphin watching trip.

    Horse Riding on the Beach Youghal02Horses, Riding and Racing
    From the area surrounding The Irish Riviera come some of the most famous race horses of modern times. Regular point to point races are held, are great fun, and are a pointer to some of the champions and trainers of the future*. For those that want to ride whilst they are in the area there are a number of options, with well established riding schools at Finisk and Midleton.

    *(The same can also be said of the Greyhounds from the area - Youghal Dog Racing track has been the starting ground for many future winners)

    Walking
    After fun on the beach, the  favourite recreation in Youghal is walking. The most popular route is the stroll along the promenade from the Green park, past the Youghal lighthouse and on to the Strand. With an uninterrupted sea view all the way, its a must for all visitors. There are 3 viewing points with seats - and you never know, you might just catch a glimpse of the dolphins that regularly fish in the river mouth, or a seal. Diversions off the promenade take you steeply up to the Golf Club road, and the top of the hill that overlooks the whole area. The views are breathtaking - but the climb will take your breath too.

    The history walk through Youghal leaves the Tourist Office at 10.30 daily. Its a historic stroll through time, well worth your time.Racing Laser's by the Youghal  Quay.  Every Sunday, visitors welcome. Pictures of beautiful Youghal, Cork, Ireland

    For longer routes many take the air along the whole strand beach from Youghal strand to Red Barn and back. Its flat and sandy all the way, a distance of 4-5 miles. Or walk the other way, along the river, along the dyke that protects the lower town. The estuary is over mile across at this point, at high tide its the domain of pleasure boats, at low tide wading birds of all types, including egrets, that roost in large numbers near the waters edge just past the bridge.

    Just outside of Youghal, at the village of Killeagh, the Glenbower woods are laid as a lovely countryside walk for all ages.

    Internet Access
    Whilst some of the most modern hotels might offer access for dial up modems, broadband is not common in holiday accommodation (indeed it's not available at all in many areas). However, you can always rely upon the Cyberroom internet cafe in Youghal high street to get you on line.

    Quad-biking, Thrill seeking (or just plain mad)
    Take an "off road" trek on your own All Terrain Vehicle - at one of two quad bike centres in the Irish Riviera. Big, small, young or old. Absolutely no experience is necessary, although you do need to book in advance. Ages from 8 years up. You will get dirty, but there are washing and changing areas to prepare you to re-enter the real world.

    Skydive Irish RivieraIf you have ever fancied throwing yourself from an airplane, well now is your chance. Just an hour away is Waterford Airport, the home Skydive Ireland, who offer you the chance to leap from a plane 10,000 feet above the earth. Apparently all you need is a healthy appetite for fun!
    Of course experienced sky divers are welcome, however you must be able to prove that you are a current member of the Parachute Association of Ireland (or your national FAI-affiliated parachuting organisation if you are a  visitor to Ireland).

    Fishing
    There has been fishing in Youghal for since it was first settled over two thousand years ago. The great river Blackwater sweeps into the sea here, and is a famous salmon fishing river. The Blackwater is Ireland's second largest river and as a large mature river, it is not subject to the whims of the weather, and consequently can provide excellent fishing even in low water. It has extensive tidal reaches, stretching for approximately 20 miles from the estuary mouth at Youghal to Lismore. This provides a unique haven for salmon and seatrout. It was declared Ireland's most prolific salmon river in 1998. Statistics issued by the Central & Southern Regional Fisheries Board confirm that the Blackwater had the highest rod catch of salmon of all Irish rivers that year. The total was a staggering 8,063 - over 35% higher than the River Moy.

    Youghal bay is a sea fishing paradise. Unspoiled, uncrowded and offering great sport, with specially fine bass fishing. At the eastern end of Youghal bay,  Knockadoon Head has great spinning or float fishing for Pollack and Mackerel, Wrasse, Conger and Dogfish. Along the miles of Youghal Strand the main problem is usually deciding where to pitch your shelter and start fishing - and the answer is just about anywhere as the fish tend to sweep along its entire length. Surf and bottom fishing for Flounder, Plaice, Dabs and Sole.

    The Green Park is Youghal is a popular spot for fishing, as its right next in the town. The main species are Codling and Coalfish in winter, and Flatfish and Pollack in the summer. For 2 weeks in the summer (in August usually) the area is alive with Mackerel and sprat. At the town quay you'll even see boys jump in and throw them out, they are so numerous!

    The Old Dyke Wall starting from the quay in Youghal town and runs up towards tip head. This is a match fishing venue, where Flounders are the main quarry. Traveling over the river Blackwater to Whiting Bay  and there's excellent sport spinning and float fishing from the rocks for Bass, Wrasse, Pollack and Mackerel in season. Surf fishing will generate lots of Flatfish and the odd Bass, even Sea-Trout, with bottom fishing taking Dabs, Plaice, Cod , Dogfish and Ray, but no Whiting!

    Further along the cost at Ballyquinn Strand  (a fabulous little used beach) is one of the premier shore fishing venues in Ireland.  Surf fishing will produce Bass, Dabs, Flounder, Painted Ray in summer and quite close in, the odd Sea-Trout and Dogfish.  More specimen fish have been recorded here than on any other beach or mark in Ireland.

    Fishing trips, by boat, out in the bay are available throughout the summer months.

    Golf
    Youghal is a perfect base for the keen golfer, as this quarter of Ireland hosts a magnificent selection of 40 parkland and coastal golf courses. You could start at Youghal's own championship course, with its spectacular setting on the cliffs overlooking the town and bay. Within a hour drive there are a string of other golf delights including Fota Island and the Old Head of Kinsale, arguably Irelands most exciting new course. Other courses include Lee Valley, Midleton, Charleville and West Waterford just to name a few.

    For aspiring golfers, there is a lovely pitch and putt course set just behind the main Strand beach.

    Cycling
    Cyclists of all ages and abilities will love Youghal, as there's something for everyone. The flat beach area is a great place to start, as the the land around the whole bay to the south of Youghal is a flat river bed, of farm lands, villages, reed beds, streams and beaches, laced with lanes and tracks for safe easy cycling.

    To the north and west of Youghal, the terrain is very different. The Blackwater and other rivers slice through ancient wooded hills, creating deep gorges and uncrowded, steep winding lanes that rise up and descend through farm land and thick woods. Challenging and energetic routes will be found to Lismore and Tallow. Although the route home is largely downhill (from Tallow at least).

    To the East of Youghal, is the open countryside if Waterford, and again this provides rich variety. Its an easy amble to the ancient seaside town of Ardmore. More adventurous cyclists, and off-roaders, will love the Commeragh mountain trails, just beyond Dungarvan 20 minutes away.

  • Fun for the kids  ( 2 items )

    kidsfunxopt.jpg

    Keeping the kids happy 
    If the kids are happy it makes everyone's holiday more enjoyable. When the sun is shining it is easy, the beach, the sea and the outdoor activities are all around. But even when the weather breaks there's still plenty to do in and around Youghal.

    Beaches
    Youghal is famed for its blue flag beaches awarded for their cleanliness and water quality. They offer fine sand and sunbathing and make a huge open air playground for all ages. Huge open strands and secluded coves, with plenty of space for all beach games and plenty of rock pools to explore. Good swimming and bodysurfing conditions prevail frequently. Lifeguards are on duty on the main strand during peak season.

    Perks Family Entertainment Centre
    On the edge of Youghal, near to the main beach is Perks Family Entertainment Centre, with more than 40,000 square feet of indoor fun, catering for all ages in all types of weather. This is a huge indoor fun palace including bowling, kids play area, fairground rides, arcade machines, pool tables, Megazone laser shots and gaming machines (adults only). MacPerkies Fast Food Restaurant and Alice's Ice Cream parlour provide a mouth-watering selection to compliment your visit including burgers, ribs, chicken and fish and seating for 80 persons. You can spend the whole day at Perks and still not get around everything.

    Bowling
    The state of the art bowling lanes have no complicated rules or fussy formalities. A computerised bowling system keeps the score for you. All you have to do is enter your name. Its easy for kids with bumper lanes and light balls. Free shoe hire.

    Megazone Lazer Shots
    Megazone Lazer Shots is a high-tech live action lazer game and played in a themed arena with special effects, fog, lazer beams, pulse-pumping music and other players to create an exciting, entertaining adventure. Players score points by deactivating opponents and their Base Stations with their lazer while defending themselves and their team's Base Station from opponents. Before each game, players are led to the Briefing Room where a Games Marshal gives a customised explanation of the rules, the game, equipment functions and safety guidelines. Once briefed, players head for the Vesting Room where they strap on their lazer vests and prepare for action. Heart pumping, senses alert, the door swings open and the action begins!!

    Blackbeard's play zone
    Blackbeard's play zone offers three decks of fun, excitement and hands on play for young children. Designed on a pirate theme it has plenty for the kids to enjoy with Ball Pools, Slides, Rope Climbing and lots, lots more. All areas are padded for protection. There is a separate area cordoned off for toddlers and parental supervision is welcomed. Height Restrictions Apply: To enter the main play area you must be taller than 3ft 3" and smaller than 4ft 10". The separate toddler area is available for children below 3ft 3". Socks Must Be Worn.

    Video & Games Arcade
    Video & Games Arcade has state of the art video games including the new EZ2 Dancer, Route 66 and Maze of the Kings. Also available is a selection of Redemption Games.
    Tickets won on these games can be exchanged for prizes at the prize shop. Why not try our Pirates Cove Shooting Gallery or challenge your friend with a game of Air Hockey?

    Snooker & Pool
    Relax and enjoy the quiet atmosphere in the Snooker & Pool Hall with 2 full size Snooker Tables and 4 full size Pool Tables.

    Kiddie Area
    To the rear of the Play Centre there are a variety of entertainment's for younger children including the Disney Land Ride, Tea Cup Ride, Ghost Train, Aqua Blasta and FREE Crazy Mirror Show.

    Cinema
    The cinema in Youghal may be small, but it shows all of the latest films, on its multi screens, with daily matinee's and early evening shows for the kids.

    Pitch and Putt
    Just behind the main strand beach is a wonderful Pitch and Putt course that would be a challenge to all budding golfers. Set on the back of a huge sand dune (Claycastle) the course is swoops up and down, over brooks and ponds. Great fun.

    Millennium Park
    The children's playground at Millennium Park in Youghal (next to Lidl and Tesco's) is great energetic fun for preteens with swings, slides and multiple climbing frames and other installations. Great for burning off some energy whilst the shopping is being done.

    Fota Wildlife Park
    Heading West out of Youghal for 20 minutes and you'll come to Fota Wildlife Park, a treat for the whole family, and entertainment for a full day. Fota is wildlife park unlike others, as you can walk around with the animals - many of which roam freely about the beautiful grounds. Don't miss it!

    Leahy's Open Farm
    North West out of Youghal for 20 minutes and you'll find Leahy's Open Farm a great trip for families with smaller children. Get up close and personal with a range of farm animals and birds, there a special kiddie play areas, and rides and a restaurant.

  • Shop 'til you drop  ( 6 items )

    shoppingbanneropt.jpg

    When you want to shop, you are spoilt for choice in The Irish Riviera. From quaint speciality stores, factory outlets and bustling farmhouse produce markets to upmarket boutiques, department stores.... and plenty of supermarkets to buy the day to day essentials.

    We've included all of the main shopping areas within The Irish Riviera, in Youghal, Dungarvan, Midleton, Cork and Waterford cities. All directions given are from Youghal, the centre of The Irish Riviera, although nowhere listed is very far from any point in the Riviera.

     

  • Nightlife  ( 1 items )
    There's lots of nightlife for all ages, from romantic dining, to late night clubbing, a quiet drink, or a trip to the dog track - there's something for everyone. And, as Youghal is a compact resort, all of the nightlife is just a short walk or cab ride from the holiday accommodation

    Pubs
    There are over 30 pubs in Youghal of all types and for all ages (NB: Children are welcomed just about everywhere until 9-10 o'clock in the evening). On the main street there are lively music bars catering to a young crowd, and these are next to equally lively bars that have live traditional music for an older crowd. And crowd is the right word, as many of the most popular pubs are very lively indeed.
    You can also find quieter pubs, where conversation or debate is the order of the day. There are even a few peculiarly Irish pubs that don't advertise their existence at all, and seem to have a clientele consisting entirely of invited guests. This impression is wrong of course, as you'll be welcome everywhere, and its almost impossible to go through the evening without finding a new friend.

    Restaurants
    Eating out in Youghal can be simple or gastronomic, traditional or exotic, there's a wide choice. Many pubs serve food during the daytime, and a number continue this in the evening. There are Pizzeria's, an Indian and very good Chinese restaurant. There are a number of good fish restaurants, and there is Ahernes. Ahernes is an institution. Rated as "one of the best fish restaurants in the world", Ahernes is deservedly world famous. The restaurant is the haunt of visiting VIP's and gastronomes from the world over, and yet it is quite unpretentious and friendly. The famous food can also be enjoyed in the two bars of their adjoining pub - famous food at a very reasonable prices.

    Cinema
    The cinema in Youghal may be small, but it shows all of the latest films, on its multi screens, with daily matinee's, evening and even late evening shows.

    Night clubs
    The pubs in Youghal tend to stay open until late, (some very late indeed), but for those who want to stay out longer and dance until the early hours there are two night clubs. Both clubs have regular party nights throughout the summer season and have a mixed crowd with everyone welcome.

    Casino and Dog Racing
    At Perks entertainment centre there are gaming machines for those who want a 'flutter'. There are a large number of European 'Lots of Cash' American 'Red. White and Blue 7's', Black Tie, Lucky 7's and a large selection of Poker Machines. The casino area is strictly over 18's only.

    Across the road is Youghal Dog Racing track, and this is a great night out for all the family. Whilst you may not consider taking your kids to the track at home, you'll see that they have a whale of a time in Youghal. Racing takes places twice a week throughout the year, with some good quality racing.


    Dancing Thru The Ages is a fresh and exciting show that intends to capture the culture of Irish music, song, and dance, and bring it to modern times giving it a new energy and rhythm. The energy of the dance troupe plays a leading role in depicting the mood and rhythm of the music from both past and present times. The excitement of driving melodies and exhilarating taps will not only captivate your mind, but hold a special place in your heart as you experience a breathtaking journey through Irish music and dance.  2 shows each week during the summer season.

     

  • Historic and Heritage sites  ( 17 items )
    Prehistoric
    Man has occupied the Blackwater Valley for almost 9,000 years. The earliest evidence for human activity comes from the Early Mesolithic (middle stone-age) period during which fishermen, hunters and gatherers with no knowledge of farming settled along the Blackwater and its tributaries "to take advantage of the migratory runs of salmon and eel". After all this time archaeologists can still find the tiny stone arrowheads, scrapers and knives they left behind at Kilcummer Lower, Wallstown and at other sites along the rivers.

    Most of the evidence for the existence of a pre-farming, hunter-gatherer society in the south-west of Ireland comes from the Blackwater Valley. Indeed if evidence is ever found that man occupied Ireland before the Mesolithic period, it is likely to come from here as the valley survived the ice-sheets which scoured the surface of the rest of the country during the last glaciation, which ended around 10,000 BC.

    The First Farmers
    The first farmers (Neolithic or late stone-age people) arrived in this area around 4,000 BC. The landscape into which they introduced agricultural techniques was an entirely forested wilderness. Clearings soon began to appear as knowledge of farming spread and the population grew.

    Labbacallee
    Labbacallee (near Kilworth) is perhaps the largest wedge-tomb in Ireland and was built over 4,000 years ago towards the end of the Stone Age and the start of the Bronze Age. Three huge capstones (the largest being 7.8 meters long and weighing 10 tonnes or more) cover the tomb and the double walls are also flanked by massive outer walling. Inside are two burial chambers, separated by a dividing slab, one corner of which has been trimmed off, perhaps to allow the spirits of the dead to come and go.

    "Labbacallee" translates as "the hag's bed", and when the tomb was excavated it was indeed found to contain the remains of a woman. But while her skeleton was carefully buried in the inner chamber of the tomb, her head was found outside!

    Little is known about the earliest settlement of Youghal. Its geographical position, a piece of flat land at the mouth of a great river, together with an abundance of pottery clay, would make it an obvious base. Here one could fish river and sea, trade upriver and overseas.

    Evidence in the form of a Mesolithic stone backed blade was found at Newport outside Youghal, while a mudstone axe was discovered near the old brickworks. The Celtic culture arrived here 2,500 years ago and many fine fortified enclosures, raths, survive in the countryside around Youghal. The earliest settlement at Youghal was probably a rath, which is remembered by the very old road running around the town called Raheen Road. The name "Youghal" derives from the old Irish "Eochaill" - meaning "Yew wood". There is evidence of contact with Roman Britain in the period before the coming of Christianity but no evidence of Roman presence here.

    Early Christian (5th Century)
    The earliest evidence of Christianity in the Youghal area is two small religious foundations. In the western suburb of the town is the site of the Church of Coran and the founder's hermitage nearby. This foundation may have been associated with the important monastery at Ardmore (5th century - 7 miles to the east).

    Molana, an island monastery three miles north of Youghal, founded in the early 6th century, became a great centre of learning and religious reform during the 7th - 10th centuries. Rath is a locally used place name and is suggestive of the presence of a settlement or homestead in a ring fort (fairy fort) in Youghal in Early Christian times.

    Viking (9th century)
    The Vikings used Youghal as a base from which they could raid the wealthy monastic sites along the south coast - such as Ardmore - or those further up the Blackwater River - at Molana and Lismore ( 18 miles upriver).

    They established a settlement at Youghal from which to carry on their trade and it is recorded that in 864 the Deise clan from the neighbouring countryside destroyed the Norse fort at Youghal. A century later in 945 the Vikings were sufficiently settled to be involved in a major battle with their own kinsmen outside Youghal.

    No traces of the Viking times have yet been uncovered, but a stone in the transept of St Mary's Collegiate Church bears the faint etched outline of a longboat.

    Hostilities with these Norwegian and Danish settlers all but ceased after the Battle of Clontarf, in which the armies of the Irish, under the command of Brian Boru, defeated the Vikings. Youghal took on the mantle of a trading port and began to service the vast hinterland of East Cork and West Waterford.

    12th Century
    1169/1171 - Anglo Norman involvement in Ireland began in this period resulting in a failed invasion in 1171 in which they captured about half the country but only fully subdued about one third. in 1173 a Norman raiding party under Strongbow had embarked their booty at Youghal for shipment to their stronghold at Waterford when they were surprised by the Irish fleet out of Cork including Gaelicised Vikings. A sea battle was waged at the harbour mouth with the Normans victorious.

    In 1177 The area around Youghal was granted by Henry II to Robert Fitzstephen. The Normans rebuilt and extended the Viking fortifications of the town.

    13th Century
    Youghal quickly gained power and influence in both Ireland and Europe, second only in stature to Bristol as the busiest port in the British Isles. "Men-at-arms, traffickers and other adventurers" of that port colonised the town throughout the 13th century. In 1202 Youghal received its first charter from King John and in 1215, Robert Fitzstephen passed the lands on to his half-brother Maurice Fitzgerald - ancestor of the Earls of Desmond. These Anglo-Norman lords gradually adopted native Irish customs and intermarried with the Irish. There is a saying that "they became more Irish than the Irish themselves".

    In 1220 St. Mary's Collegiate Church was built on the site of an earlier 11th century church. The church still stands and is one of the few remaining medieval churches in continuous use as a place of worship. The church contains some very interesting tombs, effigies and monuments. Among them is the elaborately sculptured tomb of Richard Boyle (1566-1643).

    The Franciscan Abbey was founded south of the town in 1224 during the lifetime of St. Francis - by tradition, the foundation house of the order in Ireland. The benefactor was Maurice Fitzgerald, Baron of Offaly, who was buried there in 1257. His grandson, Thomas Fitzmaurice, was the patron of the Dominican friary founded close to the North Gate. The ruins of the North Abbey can still be seen. Both Friaries were abandoned following the order of Henry VIII for the dissolution of monasteries.

    In 1275 Edward 1 levied a tax for the building of stone walls to replace the Norman walls. and the Town Walls were built. Further charters were issued for the same purpose in 1358 , 1375, 1431, 1462, 1489, 1497,1584 and 1609.

    14th Century
    Such was the measure of esteem in which Youghal was held as a trading port and naval centre that it was the only town in Ireland required to send three ships to aid Edward 1 in his Scottish Campaign. However it ultimately provided 9 of the total of 27 ships from all of Ireland which took part in the campaign.

    By 1350 Youghal was a fine walled town, trading with ports all over Europe. The town walls and its fosse on the west side, with at least 12 towers, surrounded the settlement, stretching up the hill behind the houses to prevent attack from the higher ground. Evidence of 13th/14th century houses were discovered during archaeological excavations at Chapel Lane and North Main Street.

    In 1360 St John's priory was founded in the Main Street as a minor house to the Benedictine Priory in Waterford. Small portions of the building still survive including the door arch and a small window on the street front.

    15th Century
    By the 15th century, a small extension to the walls had been made to the south to create a 'base town' with an adjoining quay. The three main openings in the walls were the Watergate, which opened onto the quays, the North Gate, the principal landward entrance to the town and the Iron gate at the southern edge. The Iron gate was later called the Trinity Gate and is now the site of the Clock Gate. The southern - liberties - gate was the entrance to the Base Town (lower classes) which was separated from the Town Proper by the Clock Gate. The wall also had various sally ports and minor gates.

    The Watergate
    The Watergate was the only access to the quay from the town. This gate was one of the busiest places in Youghal. All traders, adventurers, soldiers, clergy and prisoners bound to and from the sea passed through here. In 1462 Youghal was created one of the Irish 'cinque ports', granting the town special trading privileges.

    Pirates!
    As the influence and wealth of the Town increased, the rich pickings attracted the attentions of Algerian Pirates. Throughout the 15th century, these corsairs raided up and down the coast of Cork and Kerry, looting towns and monasteries and taking slaves.

    One pirate captain, who rejoiced in the name of Nut, commanded three heavily armed ships. He is reputed to have buried treasure on headlands along the coast and to have buried a male slave with each trove. (Youghal gardening tip - If you find a skeleton, keep digging)

    In 1464 The College at Emmet Place was Ireland's first post-Norman University. It was founded by Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl of Desmond. Pupils were aged 12-17 years, sons of the Hiberno-Norman gentry and perhaps the wealthier merchants of the town. St. Mary's became the Collegiate Church. The College being a monastic establishment, was dissolved under the order of Henry VIII but struggled on until acquired for use as a residence by Richard Boyle, First Earl of Cork.

    Tyntes Castle, a 15th century fortified castle was built on the Main Street by the Walshes, a family of Norman descent. It is unusual to have a fortified dwelling inside the town walls. It is thought to have been a store for valuable goods, with living quarters overhead.
    The tower passed into the ownership of Sir Robert Tynte in the 17th century. Tynte married the widow of the famous poet Spencer. The original windows can still be seen on the top floor. The lower windows have been altered.

    16th Century
    Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries, the town rose and fell as civil war and rebellion tore the countryside apart. The power and possessions of the Earls of Desmond generated concern and envy in the English administration. The Earls constantly tested the limits of their power and independence from the English. The Earls were feudal lords who did not take kindly to interference by monarch and administration. Inevitably, the situation led to open rebellion. In 1568 a rebellion led by James Fitzmaurice, cousin of the Earl of Desmond, was put down. A year later Fitzmaurice returned from the continent to lead another revolt and Gerrald Fitzgerald, the 14th Earl of Desmond, was drawn into the conflict. The town's defences had not been maintained properly, and Youghal soon fell to Desmond's army. The town was sacked and its fortifications broken.

    The English, led by the Earl of Ormond, recaptured Youghal some weeks later. The English forces sent to quell the rebellion then had their turn at terrorising the town. The Lord Mayor, Patrick Coppinger, was hanged from his own doorway for failing to maintain the strength of the town's defences. In 1583 Desmond failed to retake the town. His vast estates of 300,000 acres, mostly in County Limerick, but also in north Kerry, north and east Cork and west Waterford were confiscated.

    Elizabeth 1 then began to parcel out the confiscated lands to her faithful supporters and military officers, and thus began the Munster Plantation, in which lands were granted on condition of establishing colonies of English in order to quell rebellion and develop resources. As with the Laois/Offaly Plantation of 1556 and the later Ulster Plantation of 1607, the Englishmen granted the lands undertook to:

    Bring in English tenants
    Build defences
    Cultivate the land in the English manner
    Provide soldiers for defence

    Sir Walter Raleigh
    Raleigh came to Ireland as part of the army sent to put down the Desmond Rebellion. 42,000 acres extending from Youghal (The Inchiquin Seignory) were granted to the Queen's favourite, Sir Walter Raleigh (born 1552). Youghal was home to Raleigh for short periods during the 17 years in which he held the lands. His stately Elizabethan house, Myrtle Grove, built mid 16th century, was originally the residence of the Warden of the College of Youghal. Myrtle Grove is a rare example of a 16th century house that has survived largely intact. Although the house was altered in the 16th, 18th and 19th centuries, it retains its original character and contains some interior features which probably date back to the 1580s.

    In 1585 The first potatoes in Ireland were planted in the gardens of Myrtle Grove. It is possible that the house also witnessed the beginning of tobacco smoking in Ireland. By 1588/1589 Raleigh was the Mayor of Youghal. At this time the poet, Spencer was a contemporary of Raleigh's and had been granted lands in North Cork. Spencer is said to have been inspired to write the "Faerie Queen" while looking out the window of Myrtle Grove.

    17th century
    Raleigh's fortunes were in decline in the 1590's. He had limited success in inducing English tenants to settle on his estates. His major activity had been the export of oak and yew. rebellion had once again ravaged the poorly-defended plantation. English settlement and its defence was the primary reason that lands were granted. He was also involved in the ill-fated colonies in Virginia and especially on Roanoke Island. These failures gave advantage to his enemies at court. In 1602 Raleigh eventually sold his Irish possessions to Sir Richard Boyle (the first Earl of Cork).

    Raleigh sold his (failed) Irish estates to Boyle in 1602. He then displeased Elizabeth 1 by having a love affair with one of the Queen's Maids of Honour (unacceptable behaviour for one of this queen's favourites). He was thrown into the Tower of London but was released some time later when one of his ships brought back a huge treasure on a captured Spanish ship. Elizabeth died in 1603. Raleigh was framed as a member of a plot against the new ruler, James 1, and was sentenced to life imprisonment. He was released after 13 years in the Tower. The condition was that he apply himself to obtaining gold in South America. In 1617, Raleigh was back in Youghal again, preparing his ill-fated expedition to the Orinoco River in search of gold. The expedition was not a success and he was executed on his return to England in 1618.

    Sir Richard Boyle
    Boyle (born 1566) had arrived in Ireland in 1588 with few possessions. He married wisely (to a very rich heiress) in 1595 and so had the resources to purchase the estates of Raleigh. Boyle recognised the suitability of Youghal area for the production of pig iron, for which there was great demand in England. A plentiful supply of timber for charcoal, rich iron ore deposits, water power and a fine port all combined to create a busy iron industry in the early 17th century. The Yew woods from which Youghal derived its name (Irish: Eochaill) were used to feed the ironworks of Richard Boyle during the 17th century. Boyle acquired (apparently by devious means) and converted the former College into a mansion for his own use.

    He brought over settlers from England, mainly from the Bristol area. In 1616 he was elevated to Lord Boyle in recognition "of the introduction into maritime ports of our Province of Munster, and particularly in the neighbourhood of Youghal, a very excellent Colony, consisting of veteran soldiers and many other persons, brought by himself out of England."

    Amongst the other reminders of Boyle's influence in Youghal are the Almshouses, which he endowed to house six old soldiers, who were to receive a pension of £5 per annum. This service was later extended to include widows. The six houses were built in 1610 and continued in use in their original form until the mid-19th century, when some alterations took place. They are now owned by Youghal Urban District Council and still serve a similar generous purpose. Boyle renovated the south transept of St. Mary's Collegiate Church, which had been damaged in the Desmond rebellion. He had an elaborate monument built depicting himself, his two wives, and some of his 15 children. His seventh son , Robert Boyle was a famous chemist (The Boyle of "Boyle's Law) whose work was the forerunner of the modern theory of chemical elements. Boyle died in 1643 and is buried in St.Mary's Collegiate Church.

    A public clock was very important to the life of a medieval town. The first such clock was erected in 1612 on the Trinity Gate (Now the Clock Gate). Wealthy merchants would become entitled to privileges by paying for the clock parts.

    From 1641-1650 The English Civil War provided opportunities for rebellion in Ireland. Boyle Senior remained a Royalist to his death. His son, however changed sides in timely maneuvers which saved his estates and the town of Youghal. In 1642, English reinforcements landed at Youghal, in spite of the Irish guns at Ferrypoint. In 1645, Admiral William Penn commanded two frigates which were part of an unsuccessful attempt to supply aid to the garrison. The Admiral was later granted land by Cromwell. Penn's son, also called William was born near Youghal and was founder of Pennsylvania in the United States.

    Oliver Cromwell
    In July 1649, Oliver Cromwell landed in Ireland in order to put down rebellion and ensure support for his war in England. Cromwell wintered in Youghal. The geographical location of the town offered Cromwell a strategic headquarters from which he could strike at any of the major towns of the south of Ireland. Cromwell departed Ireland from Youghal on May 29th, 1650. Tradition has it that he left via the Watergate, which was thereafter known locally as Cromwell's Arch.

    At the end of the 17th century, Youghal had 33 registered vessels, while its main rivals of Cork and Kinsale had 24 and 22 respectively.

    18th Century
    Youghal emerged from the turbulent years of the 17th Century into a period of growth during the 18th century. Trade expanded, with quays and warehouses being built on reclaimed land between the medieval town and the river. Youghal's population grew from nearly 4000 in 1764 to over 10,000 by 1821. The Red House, a Queen Anne style house dating from 1703, was built by the Dutch architect Leuventhan for the Uniacke family. John Wesley opened the Wesley Chapel on Chapel Lane in 1756.

    In 1777 the Clock Gate was built on the site of Trinity Castle, part of the town's fortifications. The old Trinity gate had separated the Base Town from the medieval town proper. The Clock Gate served the town as gaol and public gallows until 1837. In 1787 a new storey was added to the Clock Gate Tower to cater for the rising number of people arrested as rebels. It was a grim building - prisoners were routinely tortured for information. Sometimes they were flogged and deported. Several members of the United Irishmen were publicly hanged from the windows. The Clock gate was a symbol of terror and tyranny for the countryside around.

    In 1779 the Mall House, containing Assembly Rooms was built on a newly built promenade along the river front. It is now used as Youghal's Town Hall and in 1796 St. Mary's Catholic Church was built.

    19th Century
    The British Army maintained its presence in Youghal right up into the 20th century and the dawn of the Irish Republic but Youghal's importance as a trading port fell during the 19th century. However with the coming of the railroad Youghal was reborn as a seaside destination, and the most popular seaside resort on the south coast.

     

  • Day trip routes  ( 1 items )
    Touring and sight-seeing
    Youghal has numerous attractions to keep you busy. But if you want to see more of Ireland, Youghal is the perfect base to explore the rich heritage, beautiful countryside, and entertainment's of the whole Irish Riviera. All of the major sites are in easy reach, with day excursions fanning out in all directions. Here are a few suggested itineraries,
    7 day tours that take in the highlights of the Irish Riviera .

     

    1. West towards Midleton
      Although Cork is just 30 minutes away there is lots to see before you get that far! The scenic coastal road begins by Youghal's 5 miles of beach and takes you around the bay, through the village of Shanagarry (birthplace of William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania State). Here you'll find the Ballymaloe Cookery School, shop and gardens, all are worth a visit. Continuing on you'll come to Ballycotton , a lovely fishing harbour and small village. Next stop is Midleton, the bustling market town between Cork and Youghal, famous for the Jameson Heritage Centre, home of some of Irelands most famous whiskeys. The whole family will enjoy a guided tour through the well preserved old distillery, although the tasting session is for the adults only! Its a 20 minute journey back to Youghal.
    2. Wildlife and the Titanic
      Heading West again for 20 minutes and you'll come to Fota Wildlife Park, a treat for the whole family, and entertainment for a full day. Fota is wildlife park unlike others, as you can walk around with the animals - many of which roam freely about the beautiful grounds. Don't miss it. Just beyond Fota and you'll come to Cobh (pronounced Cove), here you'll find the famous Queenstown Story exhibition - that explains the story of over 6 million people who emigrated from here between 1848 and 1950. The Titanic is also remembered, for this was its last port of call.
    3. Heading East towards Waterford
      Youghal is set right on the border between counties Cork and Waterford, and a trip to the Waterford city shouldn't be missed. The drive along the main road passes by the beautiful resort of Ardmore (and its spectacular beaches, headland, 1400 year old round tower and church), through the market town and harbour of Dungarvan and then skirts the southern foothills of the impressive Comeragh mountains. There are many diversions you could take, and a full guide book is recommended. In under an hour you'll be approaching the world famous Waterford Crystal factory, for its fascinating guided tour. A little further on is Waterford city centre - one of Ireland's oldest cities. Waterford has a history of continuous habitation since 852, when the Vikings established a settlement there. Check out Reginald's Tower, reputed to be the site of the wedding of Strongbow and Aoife, once a mint but now a small museum. Daily walking tours are arranged that bring this history to life. Waterford also has interesting and diverse shopping, major stores and local specialists too and a visit to the Waterford Treasures Museum just off the quays has something for everyone.
    4. Cork and Blarney
      Just 30 minutes from Youghal is Cork city, the 2nd largest city in the country and designated as European Capital of Culture for 2005. Cork is a major city and for shoppers it is a full day trip. All of the major stores are present in the compact city centre, but surrounding them are hundreds of smaller specialist stores that you will find nowhere else. The English Market should not be missed, it's an old covered market full of fresh local produce and exotic foodstuffs. When you tire of shopping just travel north for a few miles and come to the famous Blarney Castle. Kiss the Blarney stone and gain the 'gift of the gab', explore this fascinating old fortress, walk in the beautiful gardens or shop at the Blarney Woollen mills on the same site.
    5. North to Lismore and Cahir
      This is a full day excursion through some of the most beautiful countryside and sights in Ireland. Leaving Youghal via the scenic route along the Blackwater valley, you'll skirt along the river bank of this most elegant and unspoiled river. (If you get a chance on another day, take the Blackwater river cruise from Youghal, it is quite simply breathtaking - For groups of 6 or more the Tourism Office can arrange a private trip for you). Eventually you'll reach Lismore. Sadly the spectacular castle is a private residence, but the grounds are open to the public. Keep heading north rising through the Knockmealdown mountains heading for 'the Vee' an amazing mountain pass from where you'll see the whole counties of Tipperary and Kilkenny spread before you, with their patchwork quilt of fields and farms and towns. The small town of Cahir (pronounced care) is nearby, with its fabulously preserved castle. The castle is now peaceful and impressive, but was considered impregnable when built in the middle ages. A guided tour will explain the many fiendish traps its attackers would have faced, and point out the cannon ball still lodged in its walls that marked end of its period of impregnability. Just further on the Rock of Cashel is an alternative to Cahir, set on a 200ft outcrop, it is one of the most striking ecclesiastical sites in Ireland, with architectural remains from the year 370 onwards. The route back towards Youghal takes you through the mountains again and through the pretty town of Clashmore.
    6. West of Cork
      Another full day excursion around the wild west coast of County Cork, keeping clear of the overdone coach routes of the Ring of Kerry. Travelling west from Youghal, bypassing Cork and on to the famous seaside yacht haven of Kinsale, with its winding streets, pretty shops and restaurants. Through the colourful villages of Timoleague and Clonakilty and on to Rosscarbery and Glandore, with their creeks and sandy coves, and through Skibereen on to the spectacular 220m cliffs of Mizen Head . Meander back along the small roads and expect to get lost amid confusing signs (some measured in miles, some in kilometres)- its part of the experience of driving in the Emerald Isle. Everyone will help with directions but they'll expect, in exchange, to learn all about you, where you are from and how you came to be here today.
    7. North to Kilkenny
      The trip to Kilkenny takes an hour and a half, but the journey is fascinating with many stops on the way for the curious. Leaving Youghal, heading East through Dungarvan the route turns north towards Carrick on Suir, along a spectacular wooded valley through the mountains. The energetic can stop for a hillside ramble, or stroll to the Mahon waterfalls. Carrick on Suir is a pretty town straddling the river, Ormonde Castle and Tipperary Crystal are worth a visit. Continuing on the old road leads through the fertile farmlands to Kilkenny . Kilkenny is one of Irelands most delightful towns, with a lively high street and many fascinating and well preserved medieval historical sites. Chief amongst these are Kilkenny Castle, with its keep and massive open gardens, and St.Canice's Cathedral and Round Tower.
  • Beautiful countryside  ( 1 items )
    Blackwater River and wildlifeLittle egret colony Youghal
    The Blackwater river and estuary have recently be proposed as a Natural Heritage Area. Once a busy trading thoroughfare, development along the river has been frozen for hundreds of years. The result is fabulous and peaceful habitat for all manner of wildlife.

    Large colonies of Egrets nest on overhanging tree branches that dip into the water edge. Otters feast on the fish, and wild salmon are more profuse here than anywhere else in Ireland. In the Estuary the river is almost a mile across at its broadest and large flocks of wading birds live on the rich pickings between the high tides. Bird watching
    Ireland's first Bird sanctuary is at Knockadoon Head at the southern end of Youghal Bay with its spectacular views over the uninhabited Capel Island. The island hosts Chough, Peregrine and a colony of Cormorants. The headland has attracted a number of rare migrants in recent years, including Pied Wheatear (1st Irish record) and Sardinian Warbler (2nd Irish record). Scarce migrants have included Hoopoe, Lapland Bunting, Yellow -browed Warbler, Pied Flycatcher, Black Redstart (the latter occasionally in large numbers). The head is a good sea-watching point. A dirt track leads around the headland to the tip. Access to the island is by written permission from BirdWatch Ireland only. Other bird watching sites for wading birds and reed dwellers are at Ballyvergan, just behind the main Strand beach in Youghal. Species to be found here include Dunlin, Golden Plover, Brent Geese, (Buff-breasted Sandpiper, and White-rumped Sandpiper have also been sighted in autumn) along with Otters, and two types of bat.

    Fishing
    Fishing in Youghal, sea fishing, boat trips
    There has been fishing in Youghal for since it was first settled over two thousand years ago.The great river Blackwater sweeps into the sea here, and is a famous salmon fishing river. The Blackwater is Ireland's second largest river and as a large mature river, it is not subject to the whims of the weather, and consequently can provide excellent fishing even in low water. It has extensive tidal reaches, stretching for approximately 20 miles from the estuary mouth at Youghal to Lismore. This provides a unique haven for salmon and seatrout. It was declared Ireland's most prolific salmon river in 1998. Statistics issued by the Central & Southern Regional Fisheries Board confirm that the Blackwater had the highest rod catch of salmon of all Irish rivers that year. The total was a staggering 8,063 - over 35% higher than the River Moy.

    Youghal bay is a sea fishing paradise. Unspoilt, uncrowded and offering great sport, with specially fine bass fishing. At the eastern end of Youghal bay, Knockadoon Head has great spinning or float fishing for Pollack and Mackerel, Wrasse, Conger and Dogfish. Along the miles of Youghal Strand the main problem is usually deciding where to pitch your shelter and start fishing - and the answer is just about anywhere as the fish tend to sweep along its entire length. Surf and bottom fishing for Flounder, Plaice, Dabs and Sole.

    The Green Park is Youghal is a popular spot for fishing, as its right next in the town. The main species are Codling and Coalfish in winter, and Flatfish and Pollack in the summer. For 2 weeks in the summer (in August usually) the area is alive with Mackerel and sprat. At the town quay you'll even see boys jump in and throw them out, they are so numerous!

    The Old Dyke Wall starting from the quay in Youghal town and runs up towards tip head. This is a match fishing venue, where Flounders are the main quarry. Traveling over the river Blackwater to Whiting Bay and there's excellent sport spinning and float fishing from the rocks for Bass, Wrasse, Pollack and Mackerel in season. Surf fishing will generate lots of Flatfish and the odd Bass, even Sea-Trout, with bottom fishing taking Dabs, Plaice, Cod , Dogfish and Ray, but no Whiting!

    Further along the cost at Ballyquinn Strand (a fabulous little used beach) is one of the premier shore fishing venues in Ireland. Surf fishing will produce Bass, Dabs, Flounder, Painted Ray in summer and quite close in, the odd Sea-Trout and Dogfish. More specimen fish have been recorded here than on any other beach or mark in Ireland. Fishing trips, by boat, out in the bay are available throughout the summer months.

    Walking by the sea, river and mountains
    After fun on the beach, the most favourite recreation in Youghal is walking. The most popular route is the stroll along the promenade from the Green park, past the lighthouse

     

  • Places to visit  ( 2 items )
  • Things to do - Activities  ( 7 items )
    Whether you are young or old, a thrill seeker or looking to relax, there's plenty for everyone in The Irish Riviera.  Select from the menu on the left and you'll learn more about the great things to do in Youghal and the whole Irish Riviera

  • Spa and beauty treatments  ( 1 items )
    Go on, you deserve it. Pamper yourself
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